COI Gazette – April 2019

April 2019BLESSED ARE THE PEACEMAKERS

Blessed are the peacemakers, for they will be called children of God” (Matthew 5:9). These words seem more important than ever.

We are reminded that the call to peacemaking is one of the foundational teachings of Christ, in the Sermon on the Mount. It is part of being a disciple.

That we are reflecting on this vocation during Lent and Easter reminds us of two things. Firstly, Christ was the supreme example of being a peacemaker. The cross is the starkest reminder of just what that willingness to make peace between humanity and God cost. Living out a vocation to discipleship – being willing to take up our cross  and follow him – is no easy thing. Secondly, the resurrection reminds us that death does not have the last word. The resurrection is the ultimate sign of hope. In a season of woundedness, turmoil, disagreement and even acts of shocking inhumanity, it reminds us that a broken world needs hope and that there is another possibility.

In a blog post written shortly after the shocking attacks on Muslims at prayer in mosques last month in Christchurch, New Zealand, Rev Steve Stockman put it like  this: “The radical way that Jesus
laid down his life for the world is preached in our actions, as the word is literally made flesh in our neighbourhoods, media centres and across the world!”


THE GAZETTE – NEXT STEPS

Editing the Church of Ireland Gazette has been one of the most interesting jobs I have ever undertaken. It brought with it an appreciation of what has gone before, as well as a desire to see how the Gazette can best develop in the future.

The transition to our new monthly magazine format has been a successful one. It was made possible not just by the great efforts of the staff team, but also by the assistance, support and goodwill from the Gazette board. We are also looking forward to the relaunch of our website. The ambition is always to see how the Gazette can grow and develop in its appeal to readers across the Church of Ireland and beyond.

Having taken up the post of editor and overseen the transition, I feel it is an opportune time for a new editor to bring their vision for the next phase in the development and growth of the Gazette. I will therefore bring my time as editor to an end later this summer.

In a statement, the Board of the Church of Ireland Press, publisher  of the Church of Ireland Gazette, said: “… [it] is very pleased with the success of the new, monthly magazine version. The all-Ireland magazine has been devised to retain the journal’s historic commitment to record and report matters of current interest in the Church, with a renewed emphasis on balanced and in-depth articles. The new format allows it also to include items of general interest and information for the widest possible spectrum of Church people.

“The magazine has been developed under the leadership of the editor, Rev Earl Storey, and the Board is most grateful to him and to his team for the way they have transformed the Gazette for a new
generation, while respecting the paper’s history. Earl has indicated that he will be moving on to other challenges in the late summer. The Board wishes him well for the future and is delighted that he has agreed to retain his connection with the Gazette in a voluntary capacity.”

One of the most satisfying aspects of editing the Gazette has been working with a supportive staff team and board, as we have shared a vision for the Gazette. I look forward to seeing how the Church of Ireland Gazette develops in the future, supporting it in any way possible.


 

Home News

DUBLIN & GLENDALOUGH DIOCESES: A YEAR IN REVIEW

DRY INVITES SERVICE

TREE CARE AND RENEWAL CONFERENCE

DOWN & DROMORE STANDS WITH THE PERSECUTED CHURCH

ST MICHAN’S CRYPT REMAINS RECOVERED

ST PATRICK – A ROLE MODEL FOR YOUTH

PEDAL POWER – CHAPLAINCY’S 400 MILES FOR UGANDA

RURAL DEANERY ORGANISES EVENINGS ON HEALTH AND WELLBEING

STATEMENT BY BISHOP GOOD ON PPS’ BLOODY SUNDAY DECISION

DISESTABLISHMENT 150

WAR OF INDEPENDENCE SYMPOSIUM HELD IN CORK, CLOYNE & ROSS

PILGRIM LENT COURSE – MEATH & KILDARE

PREACHERS EVENT CANCELLED

ARCHIVE OF THE MONTH – GENEALOGICAL MYSTERY SOLVED:
THE KINMONTHS OF SHANDON, CORK

ARCHBISHOP ADDRESSES MEMORIAL FOR CHRISTCHURCH VICTIMS

LAUNCH OF PROTESTANT AND IRISH

CHANGING ATTITUDE IRELAND HOLDS AGM

STUDENT VOICE PROJECT LAUNCHED

MU ALL-IRELAND PRESIDENT COMMISSIONED


 

INTERVIEW

REFLECTING ON CHRISTIAN HEALING MINISTRY THE GAZETTE SPEAKS TO REV DR PAT MOLLAN, CEO AND DIRECTOR OF MINISTRY AT THE CHURCH’S MINISTRY OF HEALING, THE MOUNT, BELFAST


 

GUEST COLUMN

TRUE WORSHIP  – PHILIP YANCEY


 

THINKING WELLBEING

EXPLORING SPIRITUAL WELLBEING  – Jono Pierce


 

OPINION

LOVING THE ENEMY: ALLOWING GOD TO FILL THE IN-BETWEEN SPACE –  Iva Beranek


 

THINKING CULTURE

‘THEY SAY, IN YOUR FATHER’S HOUSE THERE’S MANY MANSIONS’ REFLECTING ON THE MUSIC OF BOB DYLAN  By Steven Cockcroft


THINKING LEADERSHIP

IT’S TRANSFORMED LIVES THAT MAKE THE DIFFERENCE
By Paddy McGlinchey


 

DEVOTIONAL

OUR SPIRITUAL WELLBEING JOURNEY By Adrian McCartney


 

LITURGICAL NOTES

REVISED COMMON LECTIONARY


 

CHILDREN

FACILITATING CHILDREN’S SPIRITUAL WELLBEING By Kirsty Lynch


 

YOUNG PEOPLE

HEALTHY SOULS, HEALTHY YOUTH By Catherine Vance


 

WORLD NEWS

FAITH LEADERS OFFER PRAYER AND SOLIDARITY AFTER NEW ZEALAND MOSQUE ATTACKS

CHRISTIAN AID – ‘EVERYONE SHOULD HAVE HAPPY BIRTH DAYS’

MOTHERS’ UNION WORLDWIDE PRESIDENT COMMISSIONED

WCC ENVIRONMENT SPECIALIST AMONG 157 KILLED IN PLANE CRASH

SOUTHERN HEMISPHERE’S ‘WORST’ CYCLONE DISASTER


BOOK REVIEWS

BORDERLANDS: NAVIGATING THE ADVENTURE OF SPIRITUAL GROWTH Author: Mark Brickman

FAMILY QUESTION TIME  Authors: Lucy Moore, Martyn Payne and Jane Leadbetter Publisher: BRF

YOU, ME AND COFFEE Author: Dianne Parsons Publisher: Lion


TRIBUTE

VEN ALBERT DUNCAN

VERY REV FREDERICK JOHN RUSK

REV JOHN MEDHURST


 

APPOINTMENTS

RETIREMENT


 

Letters

NATIONAL DAY OF PRAYER

Anyone watching the latest developments on Brexit in the House of Commons at Westminster must be flabbergasted at how things are going (or not going) forward. Public opinion seems to be describing the current crisis as ‘extraordinary times’ and the UK is fast losing credibility among the nations of the world, not only in Europe.

The last time the country faced such distress was during World War II when King George VI requested that a National Day of Prayer be observed and in a moving radio broadcast the king called upon the people of the nation and the empire
to commit their cause to God. After some events led to the deliverance of Allied troops subsequently, a National Day of Thanksgiving was held, quoting Psalm 124: “Our help is in the name of the Lord.”

Psalm 50:15 says, “Call upon Me [God] in the day of trouble” and the prophet Jeremiah confirmsthat, in so doing, God “will answer you”. Would it be unthinkable to call the country again for a National Day of Prayer for Brexit? These are, after all, unprecedented times. I think we should all say, “Amen!”

Colin Nevin Bangor Co Down

WORLD WAR I CHAPLAINS

Your article about the bravery of World War I Chaplains struck a chord.

Very recently St Peter’s parish, Antrim Road, Belfast (Connor Diocese), uncovered a photograph of a former curate of the parish

of St James’, Belfast, following its amalgamation with St Peter’s several years ago. Rev John Edmund Malone Watson was the eldest son of Rev John Watson, rector of Charlemont in Armagh.

Rev Watson was ordained in 1910 and was appointed as an army chaplain in December 1915. He was injured attending to a wounded soldier and died of his wounds on 10th April 1918, aged 31-years-old.

He had been mentioned in dispatches by Field Marshall Haig and awarded the Military Cross. His injuries occurred during six days fighting, when he was carrying out his duties and giving “close attention to the wounded,” according to the military record. He is buried in Haverskerque British Cemetery in France.

The selfless dedication of anyone exposing themselves to such danger without even carrying a weapon to offer protection speaks volumes about  the bravery of this clergyperson.

Rev Watson’s widow was Mary Kathleen Watson (neé Atkinson), of ‘Ard-Stratha’, Antrim Road, Belfast. She dedicated an altar for the use of St James’ church in his memory. This altar piece has now been relocated to St Peter’s and the parish would welcome any expression of interest from relatives of the Watson family  to properly reflect the service of this brave and distinguished cleric. Rev Watson did not have any children although his brothers did – their names were Frank, Arthur and George.

Tom Campbell Jordanstown
Co Antrim