COI GAZETTE – MAY 2019

May 2019 coverEDITORIAL – THE NEED FOR HOPE IS URGENT

We know that, following the seismic events of Good Friday, the first disciples were now fearful, uncertain and deeply puzzled as to where their future might lie.” These are words from the recent joint Holy Week and Easter message from the archbishops of Armagh.

So, how did those fearful and uncertain disciples then become people of hope, not just for themselves but for those around them? Quite simply, it was Easter that transformed them. As the joint statement said: “… there was the confidence that physical death could no longer grip them with
fear, but also a deeper conviction that, through the power of Christ, good would indeed ultimately win definitive victory over fear and evil.”

The joint message clearly rooted the need for hope in the circumstances of the moment. “Regardless of personal opinions on the various crises in Ireland, Britain, Europe and throughout the world, no reasonable person can seriously doubt the levels of anxiety, anger and divisiveness that are corroding human relationships within and through society, and even within close-knit families.”

It is hard to disagree with this – that on any of the issues there are different views, but that the concern is also the corroding of human relationships. That brings us towards dangerous territory. It is also why embodying a message of hope is so important: hope is the unique message of Christ and Easter.

The joint statement asks us to embody hope. “We must not only pray for the healing of relationships. We must also work fearlessly as ‘Easter people’ for the restoration of hope and good relationships with one another and within a wider society.” It concludes by calling us to do so with a “sense of positive purpose and in our adamant refusal just to let things happen.”

In times of uncertainty, we need to be people of hope – to somehow embody it.

Explosions in Sri Lanka on Easter Sunday, killings including those recently of Ian Ogle and 29-year- old journalist, Lyra McKee, are stark reminders that the need for “restoration of hope and good relationships with one another and within a wider society” is real.

In his work Into Your Hand: Confronting Good Friday, Walter Brueggemann says this: “Jesus stands in sharp contrast to those who mock him who will kill him. They are busy, task-oriented, prone to violence, cynical, greedy for gain.

“He is not:

• He has no task to perform, confident of the Father; he doesn’t need to do anything;

• He is an agent of non-violence; • He is not greedy for anything; • He has no cynicism.

“If we focus on that contrast between Jesus and those around him, there are two ways in the world, the way of suffering love and the way of anxious violence. The narrative invites us to choose.”

Full text of the Joint Holy week and Easter message is available at https://www.ireland.anglican.org/ news/8750/a-joint-holy-week-and


 

Home News

CLOGHER DIOCESE: A YEAR IN REVIEW

READ TOGETHER PROJECT

PENTECOST PLANS IN CASHEL, FERNS & OSSORY

‘MIND YOURSELF’ BRINGS MESSAGE OF HOPE

FUNERAL OF LYRA MCKEE IN ST ANNE’S CATHEDRAL

NEW BOOK CHARTS THE JOURNEY OF COME&C

BISHOP PAUL COLTON CELEBRATES 20TH ANNIVERSARY

TUAM AND LIMERICK JOINT QUIET DAY

HRH DUKE OF KENT VISITS CO DOWN CHURCH

ENNISKILLEN MEMORIAL SUBMITTED FOR PLANNING APPROVAL

COMMISSIONING OF NEW CONNOR MU PRESIDENT

NO EXCUSES

BICYCLES, LONG COATS AND SHOOTING JACKETS: ‘NEWS BEHIND THE NEWS’

ARCHBISHOP JACKSON STATEMENT ON SRI LANKA BOMBINGS

MOY CHURCH FIRST TO BENEFIT FROM  NEW £2M FAITH FUND

IN SEARCH OF GENDER JUSTICE

READING LIST FOR CURRENT CENTENARIES PERIOD

ECCLESIASTICAL LAUNCHES MOVEMENT FOR GOOD AWARDS


 

INTERVIEW

A LIFE-CHANGING MOMENT  DEREK JOHNSTON REFLECTS ON HIS EXPERIENCE OF CARDIAC ARREST AND HOW IT INSPIRED HIM TO LEARN A NEW LIFE-SAVING SKILL.


 

GUEST COLUMN

RISE OF THE ‘NONES’ REFLECTING ON RELIGIOUS TRENDS IN THE US By Jack Jenkins


 

THINKING WELLBEING

HOW TO KEEP HEALTHY
By Scott Brown


 

OPINION

TAKING CHARGE OF STRESS By Iva Beranek


 

LETTING GO

By Jonny Watson


 

THINKING LEADERSHIP

STIMULATING DISCUSSION ON CHURCH’S FUTURE By Lynn Glanville


 

GENERAL SYNOD

GENERAL SYNOD 2019:  A PREVIEW

By the Honorary Secretaries


 

DISESTABLISHMENT – 150

DISESTABLISHMENT – UNDERSTANDING THE HISTORY – By Kenneth Milne


DEVOTIONAL

THE JERSEY By Jono Pierce


LITURGICAL NOTES

REVISED COMMON LECTIONARY


 

CHILDREN

GUARDING CHILDREN’S SPIRITUAL, EMOTIONAL AND PHYSICAL NEEDS By Laurence Bellew


 

YOUNG PEOPLE

YOUNG PEOPLE AND THE NEED TO BELONG By Sharon Glynne


 

WORLD NEWS

NOTRE-DAME FIRE: ASSESSING THE DAMAGE AND REPAIRS

ARCHBISHOPS INVITE GLOBAL CHURCH TO PRAY FOR PEOPLE TO COME TO FAITH

MEMBERS ‘SHINE’ AT CMSI AGM
ANGLICAN TREASURER SHOT DEAD IN ROBBERY AT DIOCESAN OFFICE IN AKURE, NIGERIA

EASTER DAY BOMBINGS IN SRI LANKA

CHURCH OF ENGLAND GRAPPLES WITH SAFEGUARDING ISSUES

ANGLICAN COMMUNION APPOINTS NEW DIRECTOR

NEW LEADER OF CORRYMEELA COMMUNITY APPOINTED


 

BOOK REVIEWS

THE INTERCESSIONS RESOURCE BOOK Author: John Pritchard Publisher: SPCK; pp.174

PERSPECTIVES ON PREACHING: A WITNESS OF THE IRISH CHURCH Editors: Maurice Elliott and Patrick McGlinchey Publisher: Church of Ireland Publishing


 

TRIBUTES

VERY REV WILLIAM BEARE

REV DR JOHN CLYDE


 

APPOINTMENTS


 

LETTERS

BETHANY HOME BURIALS

The Mother and Baby Home commission of investigation has produced a widely welcomed report on burials in or associated with mother and baby institutions. It has discovered, in the case of Dublin’s Protestant ethos Bethany Home, an additional 28 children, 24 of whom died in hospital. Bethany survivors would like the commission to release the names of these children, plus date and age of death. Their names may then be inscribed on the Mount Jerome Cemetery, Bethany Home monument.

Unfortunately, the commission’s calculation of the total number of Bethany burials is wrong. Bethany survivors identified 310, including 17 unnamed children. The commission calculates 260, including 20 unnamed. The discrepancy arises because the commission report states, “The commission is not including children who had been in the institutions and who died after they were placed at nurse or boarded out.” This decision affects Bethany Home in particular, which had a practice of sending children out temporarily.

Seventy-one such children, whose names were supplied to the commission in 2018 by Derek Leinster, are excluded. Bethany survivors regard these children as Bethany victims and inscribed their names on the Bethany Monument in June 2018.

The state’s deputy chief medical advisor, Dr Winslow Sterling Berry, entered Bethany Home
at least three times in 1939. He also regarded 19 children then with nurse mothers – paid 30 shillings a month – as Bethany’s responsibility. He justified Bethany Home’s high mortality rate by stating, “it is well recognised that a large number of illegitimate children are delicate and marasmic [starving] from their birth.”

The commission needs to explain its arbitrary decision to Bethany survivors. The Minister for Children and Youth Affairs, Katherine Zappone, should intervene to help reverse what appears to be a perverse and also a callous decision. The Church of Ireland should make strong public representations on this issue, to the commission and to the minister.
(Dr) Niall Meehan
Dublin 1