COI Gazette – September 2019

sept pgEditorial – THE PRIVILEGE OF TELLING STORIES

Little did I know when I was introduced to the Church of Ireland Gazette more than 13 years ago, that I would one day have the privilege of becoming its editor.
In my years as part-time diocesancommunications officer in Connor,
a role I still occupy, I scoured theGazette each week to see if myConnor stories had made it, mindful of the often repeated request from rectors and others within the diocese – ‘Can you get it into the Gazette?’

Such is the esteem in which this publication is held, and that became even more apparent to me when,
in the wake of my appointment, I found myself the subject of some media interest. Not only was it

a departure from the norm to appoint someone who has not been ordained, but the role of editor over the past 163 years had always been undertaken by a man.

As I squirmed under the spotlight, that same spotlight I as a journalist have been pointing at others over the past 30 years, it was very clear that the Gazette is an important and highly respected publication which records the life of the Church of Ireland on this island, sharing its mission and ministry with those who are part of the Church, and people from other denominations and none.

My skill is writing. In particular, telling stories. Asked for my vision for the Gazette, I said I wanted the magazine to shout about the vibrant life of the Church, telling stories of inspirational people, life-changing projects, innovative work. I wanted photographs to breathe life into those articles, and I wanted to ensure all aspects of Church life arereflected in each issue.

I was asked if there is a future for printed magazines. Yes, there is. Competition from online media is challenging, but who does not love the solid feel of real pages? There will always be a place for a magazine to engage, inform and entertain. And we at the Gazette have also embraced modern
communications technology through our website and social media pages – make sure and follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

Change is inevitable, and at the start of this year the Gazette switched to a monthly magazine under the watch of my predecessor, the Rev Earl Storey.

As I embark on this new role aseditor, filled with excitement andnot a little nervous anticipation,
I would like to thank Earl for his much appreciated advice, and theGazette Board and staff for their support. Thanks too to the networkof diocesan communications officersand other correspondents whose contribution I value immensely.

I look forward to sharing your stories through the pages of this magazine.


 

FUTURE PUBLICATION DATES

For the remainder of 2019, theChurch of Ireland Gazette will be published online on the second Tuesday of the month, and in print on the second Friday of the month.

The December issue will also cover January 2020. From Februarynext year, our publication dates
will move forward a week, and theGazette will be available online on the first Tuesday of the month and in print on the first Friday of the month.

We will publish 10 issues during 2020 – February, March, April, May, June, July/August, September, October, November and December/ January.

For subscription information or to reserve advertising space, please email our office at gazette@ireland.anglican.org or ring 028 9267 5743 from Northern Ireland or 048 9267 5743 from RoI.


Home News

CELEBRATING 570 YEARS ORDAINED

DRUMCLIFFE FUNDING AWARD

‘A STRONGER UNITED DIOCESE’ – LIMERICK AND KILLALOE SYNOD

PLOUGHING AHEAD!

BISHOP-ELECT LOOKS AHEAD TO MOVE TO DERRY AND RAPHOE


 

MISSION  – CHANGING LIVES IN MALAWI

DIOCESAN FOCUS – DERRY AND RAPHOE DIOCESE: A YEAR IN REVIEW

INTERVIEW – WELL-RESOURCED YOUTH MINISTRY CHANGES LIVES
SIMON HENRY, NATIONAL YOUTH OFFICER, DISCUSSES HIS INSPIRATIONS AND WORK

DOWN AND DROMORE SYNOD – BISHOP MILLER SET TO RETIRE THIS YEAR

CENTRAL CHURCH NEWS – GOD IS CALLING – ARE WE LISTENING?

MUSIC – FROM WELLS CATHEDRAL TO ST ANNE’S

MUSIC -HISTORIC LINK WILL BE STRENGTHENED

MUSIC -CHORAL OUTREACH TO YOUNG SINGERS
IN OUR FIRST CHOIR CALL, WE MEET THE CHOIR OF ST POLYCARP’S CHURCH, FINAGHY, DIOCESE OF CONNOR

GUEST COLUMN – PRAY FOR THE MIRACLES JESUS HIMSELF MODELLED
By Philip Yancey

THE BIG QUESTION – HOW DOES GOD SPEAK TO YOU?

ST ANNE’S NOW SPEAKS EIGHT LANGUAGES!

CANCER – AN UNWELCOME GUEST

‘SEEING PROGRESS CAN ALLEVIATE FEAR’

CORK SYNOD – CLIMATE CHANGE ON SYNOD AGENDA

CHILDREN – HOLIDAY BIBLE CLUBS ARE JUST FANTASTIC!

HERITAGE – 1869 GAZETTE GIVES REAL-TIME INSIGHT INTO DISESTABLISHMENT

MOTHERS UNION – STARK CONTRASTS OF LIFE IN RWANDA

CONOR SYNOD – BISHOP REMEMBERED IN SYNOD PRAYERS

PEOPLE –  KEEPING THE PAST ALIVE FOR THE FUTURE MARGARET HAWKINS CHATS TO ARCHIVIST KEN HEMMINGWAY

PEOPLE – A HAPPY BLESSING


 

HOME NEWS

DIOCESAN REVIEW COMMISSION

ECCLESIASTICAL’S =£1M GIFT TO CHARITIES

MBE FOR SCOUT LEADER

AIN’T NO MOUNTAIN HIGH ENOUGH!

YOUNG PEOPLE – HELPING BUILD RESILIENCE
MADNESS 2019 IS ELECTRIC!

LEARNING ABOUT SCOTTISH CULTURE

ROSES BLOOMING AT ST JOHN’S!

PEOPLE – WARM MEMORIES OF A DEDICATED LAY READER

 

OPINION – PRAYER AS A PATH TOWARDS RESILIENCE

DEVOTIONAL – SUFFERING UNITES US ALL

HERITAGE – STRANMILLIS CHURCH MARKS CENTENARY

CRUSADER BACK IN ANCIENT CRYPT


 

WORLD NEWS

REFUGEES, CONFLICT AND DISABILITY

ANGLICAN COMMUNION POSTER GIRL

CHURCHES FIGHT EBOLA CRISIS


 

LITURGICAL NOTES


 

Home News

PARLIAMENTARY PRIVILEGE!

SEMINAR ON RECEPTIVE ECUMENISM

HISTORIC TOUR OF HOLYWOOD CHURCHES

WALKING WITH PRIDE

CHALLENGES FACED BY RURAL PARISHES

PRIORITIES FUND GRANTS OPEN

TRALEE INSTITUTION

CELEBRATING SANCTUARY SUNDAY

DISCUSSION MARKS HISTORIC MEETING

INSTITUTION IN EDENDERRY UNION

NEWS FROM SYNOD STANDING COMMITTEE

‘ALL FOR JESUS’

NEW EVANGELISTS COMMISSIONED


 

OPINION

SERIOUS TROUBLE?


BOOK REVIEWS

FROM ABBEYDALE TO NEWTOWNABBEYAuthor: The RevCanon EJ (Jim) Moore Publisher: Blurb

GOD CREATED HUMANISM Author: Theo Hobson Publisher: SPCK

LOVE CHURCH Author: Tim Matthews Publisher: Hodder & Stoughton


 

Education

SMALL SCHOOLS IN THE SPOTLIGHT


 

Letters to the Editor

A MORE HUMANE IRELAND?

In a recent Irish Times editorial (Irish Times View, June 10), the writer suggested that wider society ‘has moved on to a more humane plane, one seemingly more in tunewith the message of Christ.’

As part of their argument, they rebuked Irish Council of Churches member, the Presbyterian Church of Ireland (PCI), for its ‘lack of humanity’ in how it upholds a biblical view. A Roman Catholic bishop from the United States was also criticised for his view on ‘pride’events. And finally, closer to home,the GAFCON movement within the Anglican Communion was criticised for ‘wishing to restore the Bible to the heart of the Communion.’

Many reading the piece will no doubt agree with its conclusions. However, I and many faithful Christians simply don’t.

I don’t agree the reason many churches have shrinking attendances is because of a lack of acceptanceof homosexual identity and practice.I do believe Christ disapproved of such practices. As a member of the Trinitarian godhead, he was there when marriage, between one man and one woman, was instituted.

I don’t believe my adherence to Scripture as ‘the full counsel of God’ prevents me and others from proclaiming and passing on the Gospel. Indeed, the reality that we are all sinful human beings but offered a second chance at relationship with God through Christ’s substitutionary death on the cross is the focus of my ministry and I pray always will be.

The refusal by many to proclaim the Gospel message, as handed down by the apostles, is the reason why many churches have dwindling numbers or lie empty. Combined with an utter lack of confidence in God’s Word revealed – the Bible. That’s my understanding.

I’m aware that many within the Church of Ireland hold to a different worldview, even a different Gospel. The assertion that such a worldview has led to a more humane place, however, is debateable. Sadly, not humane to the many babies now being legally aborted. The same threat is now knocking at the door of Northern Ireland. If this is anexample of a more humane plane,then I think we need to let God, in the words of Psalm 139, ‘to search us and know our hearts, to test us and know our thoughts or if there might be any grievous way in us, and lead us in the way everlasting.’Rev Alastair Donaldson

Kinawley and Holy Trinity Parish Derrylin

CLARIFYING FULL SCOPE OF NEW LITURGY

In the snapshot of General Synod published in the June issue of the Gazette, reference was made to the discussion on a new liturgy to be provided for use in cases of miscarriage, stillbirth and neonatal death, rightly described in the article as ‘the most enduring memory of the week.’
Also in June, the Bishop of Meath and Kildare, the Rt Rev Pat Storey, wrote with characteristic empathy about the distress and sorrow felt in families suffering the loss of a baby in such circumstances (Irish Times, June 11) and the Bishop of Down and Dromore, the Rt Rev Harold Miller, spoke on Radio Ulster (Sunday Sequence, June 23) about his family’s painful experiences.

It is good to see the introduction of this liturgy being shared in the news media. I am concerned, however, that, because the titles used are misleading, the full scope of the liturgical provision is not always made clear.

The guidelines adopted along with the liturgy say that women whose pregnancies have necessitated termination are welcome to share in the liturgy as part of the pastoral care the Church extends to
them too. Members of Synod voted specifically to include these women, conscious of the unspeakable hurt and lonely grief felt in their homes too, even though personal stories may differ.

The Church of Ireland speaks for and walks alongside all women suffering such trauma and loss.

Ethne Harkness

Stewartstown Co Tyrone

DRUMGOON PARISH APPEAL

I am writing a history about ‘All Saints’, Drumgoon Parish Church, Cootehill, and would like to hear from anyone who may have stories, photographs or other relevant information.

Jonathan A Smyth

36 Dartry ParkCootehill Co Cavan

EXCELLENT!

The new Church of Ireland Gazetteis excellent. The issues to date encourage me to renew my subscription after many years.
The Rev Canon Chancellor Arthur Minion
Rector, Wexford and Kilscoran Union

 


 

Appointments, Resignations & Tributes